Interviews



Interview with Iopop

Published in Domination #17
Performed by Jazzcat


Most of you would be familiar with this coder from Triad. Not only through the demos he makes and contributes to but also the times he has been on the boards, mail scene, scene parties and internet/IRC mediums.

This interview was conducted in email in early August. Enjoy the contents!




J)
Welcome to the magazine! Please introduce yourself to the readers...

I)
Hi!
I'm a 25 years old Swede. Still in school, studying signal analysis. Will be so for at least 2 years. Been active in the scene for over 10 years. For those who don't know I'm a member of TRIAD and my main activity is coding.


J)
Could you tell us a bit about your C64 history. When did you start in the scene and what groups have you been in? And what is the main events in your career?

I)
I got my first C64 in May 1989. In the beginning I just played games but after some weeks I got bored of that and started to code basic. Got my first monitor in 1990 and started to code ML. Didn't have any drive so everything had to be saved to tape.

In January 1991 I got my first drive along with that an assembler. Finally I could do some real stuff. Met NOY at a German lecture and we started to share ideas. I learned that he and his cousin, NEPTUNE, had a demo group called ARAGORN. I joined them during the summer of 1991. Our first demo was released in October'91. We produced 5 demos until May '92 when I am Bumboo left them for JAM. During my time in JAM I released 12 issues of my magazine, JAMAICA. Did some small demos and cracks.

At Tribute'94 I got asked if I wanted to join TRIAD. The idea was that I, together with them, should do a new magazine. That never became reality. Been in TRIAD since then.

The main highlights must have been the first time I visited a big party, TCC93. The day I joined TRIAD and the first time I spotted Jamaica in the charts.


J)
In your opinion, what is the most important element of a demo on C64?

I)
Originality! Can not be stated too often. I mostly don't care if the demo has hardcore code or breathtaking story. Give me something weird and I'm happy.



J)
Is there any effect or design idea that was made by another that you really admire? And what would you like to do on C64 with coding that you have not yet done?

I)
Yes, those full screen raster split + multiplexed-dysp parts that was so popular in the late 80ies. I never had the patience to code something like that.

Things that have to be done are more dynamic demos. Today's demos are rather static, i.e. each time you run it, and it will look the same. So far the only, somewhat, dynamic demo I've seen is Avantgarde by CREST.


J)
A new demo from Triad to be released soon? Any hints on what it will be like?

I)
I hope so. At the moment I have no idea what kind of demo we will do.

If itís going to be a big one or a smaller one. A negative, scene wise, thing about me is that I mostly do stuff for my own benefit, instead of doing a demo out of it. For me, itís more to create than to release. You could in some way relate this to Kraftwerks' thoughts about making a record that is the same thing that having the record button on for 40 mins.

Demo making for us is mostly a process that grows over time, as we share ideas. It is not like we sit in a meeting with printed papers and decided what kind of effects we will use.


J)
Some say that demo lovers are divided on two types of demos. The one that has a theme/storyline and the other that is technical. What is your opinion about this?

I)
Rubbish! Why see everything in black or white. I rather have both. A strict theme- or technical demo is among the most boring things I know. But there are exceptions to this too. ?


J)
What is the most important thing that keeps Triad producing stuff on the c64?

I)
Maybe lack of social life? No, we are one of the oldest groups in the scene that is still active and we will continue being that. Somehow itís our obligation to continue until someone else can take over. On the other hand, I think, the so called scene-life has grown into us. We are used to it and feel comfortable doing it. Most of us joined the scene in the early 90ies when everyone was doing PC/Amiga stuff. So the C64 is natural for us.



J)
I know you organised some of the "Floppy" parties. Which other scene parties have you been to?

I)
Apart from three Floppy parties, I've been to: TCC93, Tribute, TP95, Dreamhack97, TP97, LCP2000, MS01 + lots of small meetings.


J)
What are your current activities these days?

I)
In the scene: I try to code when I have ideas. But also cracking when I get the chance. I also started to collect demos and cracks on a bigger scale than before and also trying to document the Swedish scene history. In real (?) life I study too much.



J)
What are the individual members of your group doing these days? Like Kingfisher, Jerry, Taper, Twoflower? Etc.

I)
Well, we have all matured and we are not 15 years old anymore. Which means that sometimes the c64 doesnít come first? But we are all active in some form. Kingfisher is still coding, Jerry keeps The Studio running, Taper spreading our releases and Twoflower doing the graphics.


J)
Was losing Hollowman a big loss for Triad or did it cause any internal disruption?

I)
Of course losing a member is harder than it was for 10 years ago. But as always when it comes to group psychology, a group will change when one of its members leaves or joins. If this was a big loss I cannot answer as I don't know yet. We had different ideas on a few topics and as I see it, it was the best solution for all of us.


J)
Ever had any wars or disliking towards some group or person in the scene?

I)
Well, never personally. But as a member of a group I've been involved in. In the early years there was this war between Aragorn and the Amiga group TBL. I can't remember what it was about. Probably something really childish as we came from the same town.

Then during the years in JAM, we were in war with ANTIC. The war was based on something that happened years before I joined. My guess is because Jam was a rather new group, so it was okay for everyone to pick on us.
     


The favourites of Iopop/Triad

Demo: RedStorm, Parapsykolog and Psykolog/PD, Kuppa 1+2/EXT
Coder: Kingfisher
Musician: Mindflow, Dane
Graphician: Twoflower, Dane, Electric
Disk Magazine: Today VN & DOM. Past The Crest, Brutal Recall, Network

Cracking group: Triad
Cracker: Kingfisher/Triad
Game: Tetris, Krakout


J)
What do you think of disk magazines on the C64 in the past and present and what do you think should be their purposes?

I)
The general quality of disk mags have changes a lot, sadly for the worse. Both for text and outfits. The text issue might be because internet sites like c64.sk. As most news are already old news. But I don't think the main purpose of the magazines should be to write exactly what the internet sites do. Give us more in-depth articles about the scene and leave those non-scene related topics to the rest. As an old editor I really like the concept of disk mags and I hope people will continue doing them.



J)
What is your opinion on the cracking scene? And the personality differences between a legal scener and an illegal scener?

I)
For me the cracking scene has become more and more important over the years. And there are still lots of games to come. Things like GTW are only positive. I hope they can find all those old games that never made it. The fact that the c64 is the only computer/console that still has a cracking scene makes it even more important to continue. Just look at the GBC scene where an intro in front of a game is considered lame. A game can always be shortened/trained in some form.

Legal sceners tend to think the cracking scene is a dead and lame thing. But I hardly care about those who whine the most as they are never contributing with nothing to the legal scene either. Just wasting their time on IRC.


J)
What are your views on the internet and how does it serve you as a tool for the C64 scene?

I)
As a communication tool it makes everything much easier than before. Still, this has some drawbacks as it somehow killed the swapping and board scene. An email is less personal than a real letter. I really miss the swapping days. When you got home after school and find out that you had got some sendings.


J)
To end this interview, here is your time to send any greetings to anyone that you know...

I)
I want to send some hi's to: All in TRIAD, Gilligan, Jucke, Dane, Britelite, Mason, Jazzcat & Slator, Hollowman & Puterman, Tempest & Abaddon, Ninja & Doc Bacardi, Acidchild, Aleksi, Bizk, Sander, TMR, Cupid and the rest of the scene I prolly forgot.


J)
Thanks for your time Henrik! Any last words for the readers?

I)
Thank you David for interviewing me! I would like you to take your chance to call our board. The Studio +4615931991. One of the few C64 boards still running. Finally do not believe the hype, be creative and try to enjoy life.

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